The masterclass…

It’s been a month since I went to Rachel Miller’s (allthingsic) strategic internal comms masterclass and I’m still energised and buzzing from the session. It was held in central london in an amazing venue called wallspace which was warm, creative and welcoming. As soon as I entered, I understood why Rachel had chosen this venue for her masterclasses.

When I read Rachel’s blog on her masterclass I knew it was something I had to do. The session promised to help us;

* Apply internal communication theory
* Equip us to have difficult conversations with our CEO and stakeholders
* Examine employee engagement and how it fits into organisations
* Understand the role of the modern senior communicator and their team
* Keep updated with the latest trends
* Analyse communication methods, including planning and stakeholders.

One of the key things I loved about this masterclass was the size of the session. It was purposely kept small and intimate (10 people). We were able to share ideas and thoughts without feeling overwhelmed or under pressure. The group I was with were fabulous and came from different organisations not only in the U.K. but from
across Europe as well.

Rachel kicked off the session with introductions and asked us why we were all there. This was great as it ensured that the session was tailored so it addressed everyone’s key concern. For me, as well as learning more about strategic internal comms, one key thing I wanted to take away from the session was measurement and how to do it successfully. This is one area that I do struggle with and I’m determined to get right as I know when it’s done correctly it can have such a massive impact on influencing key decision makers.

After intros, Rachel spoke about the evolution of Internal Comms and what it now means. This part of the session was fascinating. Like many others I ‘fell’ into internal communications and never really intended it to be my career. Listening to how internal comms came about was fantastic and gave me a greater understanding (and appreciation) for my profession.

The day flies by with lots of chatter, discussion and debate. We cover a range of subjects including what we need to do to move from good to great, how to become a trusted advisor, where does comms add value, what do we mean by engagement, how to develop a robust IC strategy plus much much more. I could have sat there until midnight listening, sharing and learning but sadly I had a train to catch and other people had lives to get on with.

One thing you need to understand about the masterclass, is that it’s not a ‘traditional’ training session – it’s not death by PowerPoint, you are not being spoken at for 8 hours and expected to jot down pages and pages of notes. It’s a collaborative session with conversation, sharing and learning. Rachel shares her experience, the tools that have been useful to her and insight on some really interesting case studies. Her delivery of the masterclass is brilliant and she ensures everyone has time for discussion and reflection.

I paid for this session myself and I don’t regret a penny, in fact I’d pay it all again!
I seriously urge you to get booked onto this day, I know spaces get sold out quickly so if you get a chance book on. I promise you will not regret a second. Oh I’m now that one step closer to nailing measurement 🙂 – thank you Rachel for a fabulous, insightful and interesting day – one of the best sessions I’ve attended!IMG_8505.JPG

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My notes….
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10 things I learnt at the Big Yak!

This weekend I travelled down to London and attended the Big Yak. Now there are only two reasons I would ever get up at an ungodly hour on a Saturday – if I was going on holiday or the Big Yak. If you’ve never heard of the Big Yak (where have you been!!) it’s a FREE Internal Communications Unconference set up by the IC crowd which is managed by three wonderful ladies, Jenni Field, Rachel Miller and Dana Leeson.

This is my second time attending the Big Yak so I kinda knew what to expect – or so I thought! This year it completely exceeded my already high expectations.

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Founders of The IC Crowd
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The measurement session

 

The day was filled with amazing conversations with fabulous people who had the same interests as me (this in itself was worth the early morning alarm).

If you’ve never been to an unconference it’s basically a conference where delegates set their own agenda and facilitate their own sessions. There were more than 30 sessions throughout the day and I managed to hot foot it across to four of them. Below are some my quick takeaways from the day:

1. We’re not Internal communicators we are Time Travellers! We need to take people to the future to what leaders care about, keep them informed of the present, what their managers care about and remind them of the past, what they care about.
2. Storytelling only works properly if it comes from the heart. Don’t force a story and expect people to fall in love with it. Our job as Internal communicators is to make sure we share, amplify and support when necessary. Stories to be meaningful need to be created by the people for the people.
3. Measurement seems to be one area that we all seem to struggle with. It was acknowledged by the group that it can be difficult to put measures on some of the things we do, but there was general agreement that we do need to look more at outcomes rather than outputs. A few people mentioned the government’s measurement framework: https://gcs.civilservice.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/GCS_GCS-Evaluation-framework_A4-_191115.pdf
4. I heard the best acronym of the day in the ‘how to get buy in from cynics’ session: CAVE people (Constantly Against Virtually Everything).
5. It’s important to get our front line colleagues on board by going back to basics and understanding what their concerns are. Allow them to gain trust in you (and your leaders) by giving them an avenue to feedback and get honest answers on questions raised.
6. We need to work with leaders and managers to understand how communication skills can help them in their role. Holding 30 min lunch time sessions is a quick way to share some knowledge and skills that could help them.
7. Don’t underestimate on how much you are worth. Try undertaking a cross charging activity to show how much value you’re bringing to an organisation compared to external resources.
8. Digital and ESNs were the big ticket items two years ago. Now it’s more on how we can engage our colleagues without getting too dazed with ‘comms bling’
9. Talking of comms bling I did love the idea of Pecha Kucha, where people do 20 slides and talk over each slide for 20 seconds, creating a 6 min video. Great for introducing new people to your organisation http://www.pechakucha.org/
10. What more can we do as a profession to be taken seriously at Board Level? We help others share their successes, shouldn’t we be doing the same for ourselves?

That’s a really quick whistle stop tour of the things I picked up. You can follow the hashtag #thebigyak for more information and you can read the following blogs from fellow attendees from the day. It truly was a fantastic day with some wonderful people. I can not wait to see what next year will bring!

@allthingsic: http://www.allthingsic.com/tby2016/
@southendscribe: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/little-help-from-my-friends-simon-rutter
@how_ic_it: https://howicitblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/18/the-big-yak-generation-ic/
@tolsen: http://thomasolsende.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/the-big-yak.html

If you’re interested in more Internal Comms networking sessions then check out CIPR INSIDES Closing The Gap conference on 4 October: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/closing-the-gap-annual-internal-communication-conference-tickets-26587288295

Believe in yourself…

For the past couple of weeks work has been very busy which has meant my weekly musings have taken a back seat lately. However, whilst I have a few minutes I thought I’d clear the cobwebs and reflect for a bit.

Today’s blog isn’t anything new or revolutionary but just my thoughts and general perceptions. Recently I’ve been involved in many conversations with friends around the topic of confidence. These conversations centred mostly around confidence in their own ability. I like to think I’m a confident person, sure I have moments of uncertainty but generally I’m a strong believer in my own skills and I know I am good at what I do. This isn’t me being cocky or arrogant, I know this because I have worked really really hard to get to where I am today.

I spend hours everyday working, learning and developing – I never really switch off and that’s because I really love what I do. However, I’m not unique in this, many of my friends and colleagues are also hard workers and are great at what they do but for some reason some of them really struggle to see how amazing they truly are. They constantly think that they are lucky to be in that role, and continuously worry that other people must think they didn’t deserve the post. When you dig a bit deeper on why they feel that way, it’s generally down to a flippant comment or a remark someone made in passing.

Now I’m all for constructive feedback – as long as it adds value. Telling someone something is rubbish but then not telling them why is not helpful. Or commenting on someone’s behaviour without any valid evidence to back it up is not appropriate. Most of us want to continue to develop and grow. We are all adults in the workplace so it’s important people are treated with respect regardless of what role they are in.

So a message to my wonderful friends and to people reading this blog: Never forget who you are and believe in yourself more. You have worked hard to get to where you are, so please don’t allow anyone to dull your sparkle. You’re all amazing people and you truly deserve whatever good comes your way – please remember that!